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What Is True Homeschooling Blog, Article, Video

Hi, my name is Jackie and to the best of my knowledge, I coined the term, true homeschooling. In a previous HomeSchool ThinkTank Parenting Podcast episode, I casually defined true homeschooling in the following way.

“True Homeschooling means you are legally homeschooling, that you are not using a public school curriculum or model in your home. You are not signed up through the public school system. You should be signed up legally as a home schooler.”

When I began using this term, I had never heard it used anywhere else. I believe that true homeschooling is best defined with an explanation of why I coined this term. I’ll share a more thoughtful definition toward the end of this article.

Why I Coined The Phrase True Homeschooling

During the COVID19 Pandemic of 2020, governments around the world shut public school buildings down and children began doing public school at home. Teachers, parents, and children of both the private school sector and public school system began calling doing public school at home – homeschooling.

Doing private or public school at home IS NOT homeschooling. In fact, these children were not homeschoolers, but they were doing public school at home. The differences between doing public school at home and true homeschooling are significant. One large difference lies in who is legally responsible for a child’s education.

Now, before I go any further, I want to be clear that it is not my intent to diminish the efforts of families who are doing private or public school at home or teachers who are trying to guide these families as they do public school at home. However, clarifying the difference between homeschooling and doing public school at home is very important.

The Inaccurate Use Of The Word Homeschooling

Veteran homeschool families, like myself, couldn’t help but notice the understandable, but inaccurate use of the word homeschooling by people around the world. Parents who have been homeschooling their children for years understand that there are significant differences between doing public school at home and [true] homeschooling.

Do you see the problem? People who had transitioned from going to school every day were now doing public or private school at home – but they were calling themselves homeschoolers.

As the founder of HomeSchool ThinkTank, I needed a way to differentiate between this casual and inaccurate use of the word homeschooling and true homeschooling.

There are significant differences between doing school at home and true homeschooling.

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Why You Should Understand the Differences Between Doing Public School at Home & True Homeschooling

If you are doing private or public school at home you might think that homeschooling is awful! Here’s the deal. True homeschooling is very different than doing public school at home.

Doing public school at home probably is terrible!

Here are some of the key differences between doing public school at home and true homeschooling.

I want to help parents and children understand that doing public or private school at home is very different from truly homeschooling because as a true homeschooling family, you have many more options.

Muddling The Definition Of Homeschooling – A Bigger Problem

Let me explain another reason that the muddling of the word homeschooling troubles me. I am concerned about the future legal rights of true homeschoolers.

Now, let me be clear, I am not a lawyer and HomeSchool ThinkTank does not give legal advice. With that being said, I understand that words are powerful.

It concerns me greatly that the media, the government, teachers, parents, and children are calling public school at home – homeschooling.

When the definition of a word becomes muddled, it can make matters very unclear.

The Word Homeschool Usually Implies a Legal Status

The word homeschooling often implies the legal status of how a child is educated. For example, in most states and in many countries, if a parent wants to truly homeschool their child, the parent is required by law to register their child with the state or government’s department of education as a homeschooled student.

While your local law needs to be considered, if you are actually homeschooling, you may approach your child’s education in a very different way than is done in the public school system. You can learn how to homeschool your kids here.

Protecting the Word Homeschooling

If you are like me, you do not want true homeschooling to be lumped together with this new breed of “homeschooling.” While I am using the term true homeschooling frequently when speaking and writing, I am only doing this to clearly distinguish the differences between real homeschoolers and people who are doing public school at home.

I do believe that it is important for true homeschoolers to defend both the every day use and the legal use of the word homeschooling.

I believe that if we want to maintain true homeschooling rights in the future, that we need to help educate others and explain that doing public school at home is not homeschooling.

We need to help people who are doing public school at home understand the significance that their casual use of the word homeschooling has and help them define doing public school at home differently.

As true homeschoolers, I believe that it is our responsibility to protect and defend the word homeschooling.

Definition Of True Homeschooling

True homeschooling is when a parent has chosen to take full responsibility for their child’s education. A child is presumably not enrolled in public or private school. The parent has likely registered their child as a homeschooled student with their government’s department of education. A true homeschooling family is unlikely to follow a public school curriculum or model in their home and has a choice in how to approach their child’s education.”

This definition may alter slightly over time, but this is the essence of true homeschooling.

True homeschooling includes choice, responsibility, and flexibility in your approach to your child’s education and in your ability to alter your family’s daily living habits in a way that suits your family.

Live & Learn Your WayTM

There are many reasons that I chose the slogan, Live & Learn Your WayTM as HomeSchool ThinkTank’sTM slogan. I firmly believe that every family is unique and has the right to live and learn in a way that works for their family.

In my opinion, this is a right that you should own and insist upon for your family and the future of your children.

Please, do your part and help protect the word homeschooling. Kindly help others understand that true homeschoolers are the only families who are homeschooling.

If this rings true to you, then maybe you’ll consider sharing this article with other parents, educators, homeschooling groups, and organizations.

Live & Learn Your Way! HomeSchool ThinkTank! Are you thinking about homeschooling?

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https://homeschoolthinktank.com/true-homeschooling/

More Articles & Podcast Episodes For You

Use of the Phrase True Homeschooling

One of the first times I used the terminology, true homeschooling, publicly was on April 7, 2020, I used this phrase in a podcast episode entitled: Is School At Home The Same As Homeschooling?